Calendula Flowers
Rabbit's Pantry

Calendula Flowers

Regular price $2.90 $0.00 Unit price per

Usage:
Leg ulcers, Prostate swelling and pelvic pain, Pressure ulcers. Vaginal yeast infection, Cancer, Fever, Hemorrhoids, Ear infections (otitis media), Gum inflammation, Painful mouth sores (oral mucositis), Muscle spasms, Diaper rash, Nosebleeds, Promoting menstruation, Treating mouth and throat soreness, Varicose veins.

Want to learn more?  We knew you did...

Brilliant golden orange Calendula flowers have been used as a food, coloring agent for fabric and food (cheese), and have graced statues of Hindu deities in temples. The Genus Calendula contains about 20 different species of annual or perennial herbaceous plants and is native to the northern Mediterranean regions. The genus name is derived from the Latin word, "kalendae", which means the first day of the month, probably referring to the fact that the flowers are in bloom at the start of most months in the year in their native regions. Although a common name of this plant is "Pot Marigold", it is not related to the Tagetes or Marigold Genus. Calendula flower petals can be added as a flavoring to rice, grain dishes, salads and used as a replacement for Saffron.

Calendula is a plant. The flower is used to make medicine. Calendula flower is commonly used for wounds, rashes, infection, inflammation, and many other conditions. However, there is not strong evidence to support the use of calendula for these uses.

Don't confuse calendula with ornamental marigolds of the Tagets genus, which are commonly grown in vegetable gardens.

How does it work?
It is thought that the chemicals in calendula help new tissue grow in wounds and decrease swelling in the mouth and throat.Calendula (Calendula officinalis, Asteraceae) is one of the easiest herbs to grow and a highly versatile medicinal plant—naturally, it finds its way into the hearts and gardens of all herb lovers. It has been used for centuries, both internally and topically, to heal wounds, burns, and rashes. The sunshiny flowers are a traditional remedy for supporting the immune system and lifting the spirits. If that weren’t enough, the edible ray florets of the flower heads (which look like yellow petals) are bursting with antioxidant compounds.

Possible side effects include:

  • Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Don't take calendula by mouth if you are pregnant. It is LIKELY UNSAFE. There is a concern that it might cause a miscarriage. It's best to avoid topical use as well until more is known.
  • There is not enough reliable information about the safety of using calendula if you are breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.
  • Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Calendula may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking calendula.
  • Surgery: Calendula might cause too much drowsiness if combined with medications used during and after surgery. Stop taking calendula at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.
As always make sure you are using organic herbs as pesticides are toxic and always take normal doses, excessive amounts of anything is not good for you.

We are not doctors, lawyers, accountants or your mom.  We give out free smiles and the occasional unsolicited advice.  That being said; if you are pregnant, nursing or concerned about your health, call your mom.  Or even better, consult a doctors before consuming; particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.