Cat Nip
Rabbit's Pantry

Cat Nip

Regular price $2.10 $0.00 Unit price per

Usage:
Mosquito repellent, Anxiety, Arthritis, Common cold, Fever.
Flu (influenza), Gas (flatulence), Hemorrhoids, Hives (urticaria), Indigestion (dyspepsia).

Want to learn more?  We knew you did...

Catnip is member of the mint (lamiaceae) family, more noted for its effect on felines than humans. Many are surprised to find that it has benefits for humans, beyond a wonderfully fragrant and sublimely flowered garden mint. The name Nepeta is believed to have come from the town of Nepete in Italy. Cataria is thought to have come from the Latin word for cat. It is native to Europe and Asia but was introduced to North America by the colonists.he active ingredient, which causes unusual behavior in cats, is a volatile oil called nepetalactone, which can be found in the leaves & stem of the plant.

It is also interesting to note that this essential oil was found in one study to be about ten times more effective at repelling mosquitoes than DEET, which is the active ingredient in most insect repellents. It has a long tradition in England and France as a kitchen aid. It was also used occasionally as a stimulating drink until the introduction of black tea. Several Native American tribes used it to support immune function and for relaxing muscle spasm and cramps associated with digestion. Catnip supports healthy digestive motility.. The flowering tops are used to make medicine.

Catnip is used by mouth, applied directly to the skin, or inhaled for many different conditions. But there is no good scientific research to support any of these uses.

In manufacturing, catnip is used as a pesticide and insecticide.

How does it work?
It's thought that the chemicals in catnip have a calming effect. Also, the oils in catnip have insect repellant effects.

Possible side effects include:

  • Catnip is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when smoked or taken by mouth in high doses (many cups of catnip tea, for example). It can cause headaches, vomiting, and a feeling of being ill.
  • Children: Catnip is POSSIBLY UNSAFE for children when taken by mouth. There has been one report of a child experiencing stomach pain, irritability, and sluggishness after taking catnip leaves and tea.
  • Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It is LIKELY UNSAFE to use take catnip during pregnancy. There is some evidence that catnip can stimulate the uterus. This might cause a miscarriage.
  • There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking catnip if you are breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side, and avoid use.
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID): Women with PID should avoid using catnip because it can start menstruation.
  • Heavy menstrual periods (menorrhagia): Because catnip can cause menstruation, it might make heavy menstrual periods worse.
  • Surgery: Catnip seems to be able to slow down the central nervous system (CNS), causing sleepiness and other effects. Anesthesia and some other drugs used during and after surgery also slow down the CNS. There is a concern that using catnip along with these drugs might slow down the CNS too much. Stop using catnip at least two weeks before a scheduled surgery.
As always make sure you are using organic herbs as pesticides are toxic and always take normal doses, excessive amounts of anything is not good for you.

We are not doctors, lawyers, accountants or your mom.  We give out free smiles and the occasional unsolicited advice.  That being said; if you are pregnant, nursing or concerned about your health, call your mom.  Or even better, consult a doctors before consuming; particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.