Corn Flower
Rabbit's Pantry

Corn Flower

Regular price $1.50 $0.00 Unit price per

Usage:
Fever, Menstrual disorders, Yeast infections, Constipation, Chest congestion, Liver and gallbladder disorders, Eye irritation(anti-inflammatory properties), Stomach ulcers, Improving digestion, Healing of sores or bleeding gums in the mouth, Detoxifying the liver. 

Want to learn more?  We knew you did...

Cornflower is an herb. Cornflowers have light green branching stems topped by deep blue floral centers that are ringed evenly by pointed florets of the same intense blue hue.

The Latin name, Cyanus, was given the Cornflower after a youthful devotee of the goddess Flora (Cyanus), whose favourite flower it was, and the name of the genus is derived from the Centaur, Chiron, who taught mankind the healing virtue of herbs. It has long been cultivated as a garden plant, in several colours as well as white. C. montana, a perennial form, is frequent in gardens.

The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs).Centaurea Cyanus, the Cornflower, with its star-like blossoms of brilliant blue, is one of our most striking wild-flowers, though it is always looked on as an unwelcome weed by the farmer, for not only does it by its presence withdraw nourishment from the ground that is needed for the corn.

Plants can grow to 30 inches in height with a radius of 12 inches.The dried flowers are used to make medicine.

People take cornflower tea to treat fever, constipation, water retention, and chest congestion. They also take it as a tonic, bitter, and liver and gallbladder stimulant. Women take it for menstrual disorders and vaginal yeast infections.

Some people apply cornflower directly to the eye for irritation or discomfort.

In foods, cornflower is used in herbal teas to provide color.

Possible side effects include:

  • Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking cornflower if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.
  • Allergy to ragweed, daisies, and related plants: Cornflower may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae plant family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before using cornflower.
As always make sure you are using organic herbs as pesticides are toxic and always take normal doses, excessive amounts of anything is not good for you.

We are not doctors, lawyers, accountants or your mom.  We give out free smiles and the occasional unsolicited advice.  That being said; if you are pregnant, nursing or concerned about your health, call your mom.  Or even better, consult a doctors before consuming; particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.