Thyme
Rabbit's Pantry

Thyme

Regular price $4.70 $0.00 Unit price per

Usage:
Stress relief, Bad breath, Agitation, Hair loss, Bronchitis, Cough,  Movement disorders (dyspraxia), Colic, Ear infections, Preventing bedwetting, Sore throat, Swelling (inflammation) of the lungs and mouth, Swelling (inflammation) of the tonsils.

Want to learn more?  We knew you did...

Thyme, (Thymus vulgaris), pungent herb of the mint family (Lamiaceae) known for the aroma and flavour of its dried leaves and flowering tops. Thyme is native to Eurasia and is cultivated throughout the world. It is used to flavour a wide range of foods, including poultry, stuffings, fish, eggs, meats, sauces, soups, vegetables, cheeses, and pastas. It is one of the herbs used to flavour Benedictine liqueur and is a characteristic seasoning in the traditional English dish jugged hare. The principal component of its essential oil is thymol, or thyme camphor, which is used in the manufacture of perfumes and dentifrices. Some thyme varieties are grown as ornamental ground covers.
In manufacturing, red thyme oil is used in perfumes. It is also used in soaps, cosmetics, and toothpastes.

Thyme has a long history of use that dates back as far as 2750 BC with Sumerian cuneiform tablets suggesting that Thyme be dried and pulverized with pears, figs and water for use as a poultice. The Egyptians used it to embalm their dead, and the Romans threw Thyme on their floors to deter venomous creatures. The Benedictine monks added Thyme to their elixirs for its health supportive benefits. Both in the past and today, thyme has been readily used as a culinary spice in chowders, stews, sauces and stuffing.

There are up to 400 different species of Thyme including different culinary flavored thymes such as lemon thyme and decorative species such as creeping thyme. Thyme grows in many regions around the world, but prefers dry, rocky soil. It is cultivated commercially in Europe, especially Hungary, Turkey and Germany.


How does it work?
Thyme contains chemicals that might help bacterial and fungal infections, and minor irritations. It also might relieve smooth muscle spasms, such as coughing, and have antioxidant effects.

Thyme is taken by mouth for bronchitis, whooping cough, sore throat, colic, arthritis, upset stomach, stomach pain (gastritis), diarrhea, bedwetting, a movement disorder in children (dyspraxia), intestinal gas (flatulence), parasitic worm infections, and skin disorders. It is also used to increase urine flow (as a diuretic), to disinfect the urine, and as an appetite stimulant.

Some people apply thyme directly to the skin to act as a counterirritant, for hoarseness (laryngitis), swollen tonsils (tonsillitis), sore mouth, and bad breath.

Thyme oil is used as a germ-killer in mouthwashes and liniments. It is also applied to the scalp to treat baldness and to the ears to fight bacterial and fungal infections.

Thymol, one of the chemicals in thyme, is used with another chemical, chlorhexidine, as a dental varnish to prevent tooth decay.

In foods, thyme is used as a flavoring agent.

Possible side effects include:

  • Children: Thyme is LIKELY SAFE when consumed by children in normal food amounts. Thyme is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken as medicine for short periods of time. There isn't enough information to know whether thyme oil is safe for children when applied to the skin or taken by mouth.
  • Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Thyme is LIKELY SAFE for pregnant and breast-feeding women when consumed in normal food amounts. But it's not known whether it's safe to use thyme in larger medicinal amounts. Stick to amounts food naturally in foods if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.
  • Allergy to oregano and similar plants: People who are allergic to oregano or other Lamiaceae species might also be allergic to thyme.
  • Bleeding disorders: Thyme might slow blood clotting. Taking thyme might increase your risk of bleeding, especially if used in large amounts.
  • Hormone-sensitive conditions such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: Thyme might act like estrogen in the body. If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, don't use thyme.
  • Surgery: Thyme might slow blood clotting, so there is some concern that it might increase the risk of extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using thyme at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.
As always make sure you are using organic herbs as pesticides are toxic and always take normal doses, excessive amounts of anything is not good for you.

We are not doctors, lawyers, accountants or your mom.  We give out free smiles and the occasional unsolicited advice.  That being said; if you are pregnant, nursing or concerned about your health, call your mom.  Or even better, consult a doctors before consuming; particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

For educational purposes only. This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.